The Ramblings of a Quixotic Dad, Firefighter, EMT, and God-knows-what-else…

Random

“Agere sequitur credere.”

Literally, “action follows belief.”

In just under 4 days, I will no longer be “kindofafireguy.” At least, not professionally.

At the moment, I don’t know what I’ll be. I have some offers in the same general field, and I’ll land on my feet. Honestly, being a firefighter will always be a part of me, no matter what career path I now follow. I intend to remain in public safety, so maybe I’ll be “kindofapublicsafetyguy.” Who knows.

My wife and I have decided to uproot ourselves from our lives here in the windswept West of Texas, and return to the lands of our youth. It is a bittersweet parting. In some ways, it will be a homecoming for the both of us, as we move closer to a place we grew up in, and a place that truly was always a part of us.

Throughout these last few years, I have spent hours upon hours trying to explain to people the differences between where I lived and where I was from. Growing up in the deep south of Louisiana, things were done a bit differently than in Texas. The advent of “Swamp People” didn’t exactly help (when I was a rookie firefighter, there was many a time I was called into the day room to “translate” the deep Cajun accents for the rest of the crew). While many of them were always tempted to make fun of the way we talk, act, and are, I was always reminded of the song “A Southern Thing” by Louisiana band Better Than Ezra. The chorus has a line that states “Don’t mock what you don’t understand / It’s a southern thing.”

It’s true. It’s a southern thing. I would jokingly tell everyone at work that as far as I concerned, they were all Yankees and might as well have been from the Northeast.

In some ways, though, it was somewhat true. My wife and I would often talk about life back “home.” The people were different. The food was different. The culture was unique. My wife became interested in genealogy a while back, and the more she researched, the more we came to understand that Cajuns are all, basically, one giant extended family. From a small exiled band came a culture and group that occupy almost an entire portion of a state.

And in a way, I’m excited to get back to that, back to “me and my honey rockin’ back and forth / light it up again with my kin and friends.”

But in a way, this was our home, too. My wife moved here over 5 years ago, and I followed behind her shortly after. This is where we first lived together. It’s where we built a life with our kids. And that is something that is hard to give up.

“Action follows belief.”

My wife and I believe that we are doing the right thing. We believe that it will be better for our kids, better for our family, better for us, to return. To be closer to the rest of our family. To get a fresh start. And so we have taken action.

“Audentes fortuna iuvat.”

Fortune favors the bold, and bold we shall be.


To wonder, “Do I dare?” and, “Do I dare?”

When she put the poster in her office (which had, until the day before, been a small closet), I couldn’t help but stare. For National Poetry Month in 2009, the American Academy of Poets put out a beautiful image of these two lines written into the condensation of a piece of glass.

“Do I dare /Disturb the universe?”

T.S. Eliot’s The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock is a complicated poem, one whose analysis is way beyond my scope. But I love it.

“Do I dare /Disturb the universe?”

I love that thought. It haunts me.

Mainly, it’s because I find myself asking myself that question all the time. Oftentimes, first responders (regardless of what field – EMS, Fire, Law Enforcement, etc) find themselves in futile situations. Anyone who has ever worked a cardiac arrest at a nursing home will understand what I mean.

“Do I dare /Disturb the universe? / In a minute there is time / For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.”

If only it were that simple. But still, I wonder.

Do I dare?

Do you?


Random Thoughts on a Monday

Holy hell. I haven’t been on here in close to two weeks. A lot has been going on, though. Kindofafirewife just defended her dissertation, and is now Dr. Kindofafirewife. Hell yeah!

I’ve also been doing a lot of time on the ambulance. I had one day where I started multiple large bore IVs on multiple patients, which was a first for me. I’ve usually only gotten to do one or two. To top it off, they were medicals.

More to come.

 

Oh yeah. An officer at my station tried to pass off vegetable stew to me as gumbo. I’m Cajun. Gumbo does not include cabbage, squash, zucchini, or ranch style beans. But it does make for a hell of a vegetable stew.


I would shiver the whole night through…

So I was having a minor email debate with my brother today. I sent him a link to the Nirvana Unplugged recording of Kurt Cobain singing “Where Did You Sleep Last Night,” an old folk song that was made famous by the blues singer Lead Belly. I honestly believe it to be the greatest live recording of ANY song. 

He disagreed, favoring Clapton unplugged. Excellent choice, but it never haunted me the way Cobain’s does.

If you haven’t seen it, I highly recommend it. The only bad thing is that it makes me painfully aware of how little talent I really have.

Random, I know. But it’s just so dern awesome.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcXYz0gtJeM&feature=related